Pencil sculptures: miniature masterpieces carved into graphite by Dalton Ghetti

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Pencil sculptures: miniature masterpieces carved into graphite by Dalton Ghetti

One of those things I got from a friend in email and just had to post. So. Cool.

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Dalton Ghetti makes sculptures out of pencils, including a tiny saw and a pencil whose center has been carved into a chain, which is framed.







The alphabet, all carved from pencil tips


The alphabet, all carved from 26 pencil tips



A sculpture of Elvis Presley wearing shades, carved from a single pencil

Dalton, who works as a carpenter, has been making his tiny graphite works for about 25 years
A sculpture of Elvis Presley wearing shades, carved from a single pencil



This incredible work is a tiny saw, using both the wood and graphite of a single pencil

The 49 year old said: "At school I would carve a friend's name into the wood of a pencil and then give it to them as a present. Later, when I got into sculpture, I would make these huge pieces from things like wood, but decided I wanted to challenge myself by trying to make things as small as possible. I experimented sculpting with different materials, such as chalk, but one day I had an eureka moment and decided to carve into the graphite of a pencil"

A tiny saw, using both the wood and graphite of a single pencil



Dalton uses a sculpting knife to begin his latest creation

Dalton uses three basic tools to make his incredible creations - a razor blade, sewing needle and sculpting knife. He even refuses to use a magnifying glass and has never sold any of his work, only given it away to friends. He said: "I use the sewing needle to make holes or dig into the graphite. I scratch and create lines and turn the graphite around slowly in my hand"



A tiny chain link, all carved from the same graphite centre of the pencil

The longest Dalton has spent on one piece was two and half years on a pencil with interlinking chains. A standard figure will take several months. He said: "The interlinking chains took the most effort and I was really pleased with it because it's so intricate people think it must be two pencils"



A tiny key hangs from a ring

When Dalton, from Connecticut, USA, first started he would become frustrated when a piece would break before being finished after he had spent months working on it. He said: "It would drive me mad when I would be just a bit too heavy handed and the pencil's tip would break. I would get very nervous sometimes, particularly when the piece was almost finished, and then I would make a mistake. I decided to change the way I thought about the work - when I started a new piece my attitude would be 'well this will break eventually but let's see how far I get. It helped me break fewer pencils, and although I still do break them, it's not as often"



A tiny key hangs from a ring
The pieces that didn't work are kept in this bizarre 'graveyard'. Dalton keeps all the works that broke off during the sculpt pinned into a block

Dalton, who is originally from Brazil, has a box full of more than 100 sculptures that have broken while working on them that he affectionately calls 'the cemetery collection'. He said: "I have quite a few broken pieces so I decided to glue them on pins and into styrofoam for a display case. People might think it's weird I keep them but they're still interesting. I worked on them for months so they might be dead now but at one point I gave them life"



Two interlocking hearts, carved from one pencil

Dalton has made about 100 carvings, and is currently working on an epic piece inspired by the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. He said: "I decided to make a teardrop pencil carving for each of the people who died in the attack, about 3,000. Since 2002 I have carved one every day, it takes me under an hour. When I'm done they will form one big tear drop. It will take me about 10 years but it will be worth it"

Two interlocking hearts, carved from one pencil

Dalton hollowed out the centre of the wood, then carved the central column of graphite to create this hanging, linked heart


"I don't make any money from it but that's not what it's about for me. However, I would love for a gallery owner in England to fly me over to put on a show," he said

Dalton hollowed out the centre of the wood, then carved the central column of graphite to create this hanging, linked heart
Carved from the graphite in a normal pencil: A tiny hammer
Carved from the graphite in a normal pencil: A tiny hammer
Carved from the graphite in a normal pencil: A tiny button




Carved from the graphite in a normal pencil: A tiny button



This carving shows a goblet being held by a hand, all carved from one pencil's graphite




This carving shows a goblet being held by a hand, all carved from one pencil's graphite

Carved from the graphite in a normal pencil: A highly-detailed boot.

Carved from the graphite in a normal pencil: A highly-detailed boot
A miniature graphite chair
A miniature graphite chair
Using the eraser end of a pencil, Dalton created a tiny cross sculpture from the internal graphite
Using the eraser end of a pencil, Dalton created a tiny cross sculpture from the internal graphite
A mini mailbox on a post
A mini mailbox on a post
An intricately-detailed screw, carved in one piece from a pencil's graphite
An intricately-detailed screw, carved in one piece from a pencil's graphite






2 comments:

  1. This is so amazing, I love it! What a fun hobby and cool that he is so humble and doesn't want to sell them. I also noticed the effect created on the wood of the pencil at the top, the graphite "veins" are so pretty! It seems like it's a completely unintentional side effect of craving the graphite - it must sprinkle down and then settle/get smushed on the ridges where the wood was carved.

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